Introducing Artist No. 39 – Kirista Trask

Kirista Trask’s forays into the art world as a child were focused on the performing arts, theatre and band. She didn’t experiment with the visual arts until she was in her 20’s. “Even then, I was primarily a crafter and it was not until I went through divorce that my full potential as an artist came to fruition. I then went to the University of Oregon where I studied Sculpture and Business. When I graduated I started to try and figure out what I needed to do to become a “real artist”. Part of that was really defining a solid creative practice and that was how I discovered painting and mixed media art. It was life changing and really defined my direction as an artist.

“My creative practice has become much more clearly defined over time. Parts of my creative practice have expanded, like what things I use to paint with but the majority of it has become very minimal. I am learning to be consistent with my creation, getting into the studio regularly, having a routine and constantly learning new things. Recently I started using more natural supplies in my painting and it felt like I was really opening the door for my creative practice. The biggest thing that has changed for my creative process has been a commitment to my own self care practices. What I am eating, how I am moving my body, and whether I am balancing all the moving parts of my life make a huge impact on my ability to create the type of work I am trying to produce.

“I think Artists play a vital role in society as we have the ability to bring light and emotion to subjects that are scary and/or controversial. I work with the nonprofit St Johns Center for Opportunity where we use community and arts engagement to bring important conversations to our neighborhood. Not only are we using art to start these conversations but we also use arts engagement for community building. In my work with SJCO I have had to really think about what roles artists can play in important conversations about racism, gentrification, and affordable housing. I think for some artists art is a creative path to their own higher self but I also think for many artists it is platform for greater social change.”

Currently, Kirista is developing a coaching program that helps to line up the business side of art with the creative side of art. “Ultimately it is my goal to work with female artists on creating amazing, valuable, and sustainable art careers. I am also getting ready to do a week long artist residency in which my goal is to create a 44 card deck on self-transformation through the dark times. I have been doing research for my residency over the last six months and am really looking forward to really focusing on my residency and what kind of self-evolution might come from that. I am also working with the St Johns Center for Opportunity to curate quarterly arts events that include a Friday night Art walk and a Saturday morning art fair. It has been incredible to work with local business and artists as a community to really create a platform for artists to engage with the St Johns Community.”

Kirista is one of three artists in her building participating in the Portland Open Studios tour in October. “You will find a huge selection of new work, prints and products that will be released right before the tour. If you are so inclined to get your hands a little dirty I will also be working on a couple of collaborative processes that will allow visitors to get engaged in the artistic process as little or as much as they would like.”

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