Introducing Artist No. 28 – Annie Salness

Annie Salness charted her own journey to becoming an artist. She attended Cal State Long Beach for illustration, where she studied biomedical illustrations. She took a lot of science like plant zoology, human anatomy, and marine zoology. She went to work making drawings for things like medical books. She remembers being asked to draw before and after pictures for breast augmentation and liposuction surgeries.  She is also very athletic, so she also coached with her husband.

“I moved up here and did volunteer work at the church with my art, but I didn’t produce any art. And I didn’t know any artists. That’s a whole different world. I knew coaches and teachers, but I didn’t know any artists. I started networking and going different places and meeting people, and I would take classes on line. I knew I had the art knowledge, but I didn’t know how to market myself. That’s where I feel there is a big lack in art school. They don’t teach you that side of it. It’s really too bad, because a lot of it is business. Then I had the stroke.”

The stroke was a pivotal experience for Annie. She had to change from painting with her right hand to working with her left hand. She feels the stroke didn’t changed her art, but it did help her become stronger as a person. “Things don’t mean that much. I have a better perspective, which will come out in your art. I guess I don’t fill my days with stuff that really doesn’t matter. It takes me a long time just to move from here to there, so I don’t.”

She is working now on her 2018 calendar, which she is calling ‘Flavors’. “I chose the theme of ‘Flavors’ because it would allow me to paint such a wide variety of things—and it would allow my friends to send in their favorite flavor combinations along with their favorite recipes. I like when there is research to do, especially putting together the flavors – ‘jalapenos – what is a cooler way that I can do this.’ I also like the stories that go with [the recipes]. One girl gave me an Indian recipe, so I’m going to research India. What is it that makes that Indian?” She thinks the research changes the way she paints. When she does a commission of a dog, she wants to meet the dog, see how they react. “I’m also working on a St. John’s bridge so I’m looking at the history of it; the original drawings of it. I like to do the history on it.”

She also likes to personalize her paintings. For instance, one patron asked for a picture of Gerber daisies. So she asked if they had something personal, like a vase that had meaning for them, to put in the picture. “It can be a picture on the wall for others, but for you it’s personal.”
Annie has had many memorable responses to her commissioned work. ”People seem to love it, and when I do a commission sometimes they cry. I do a lot of dogs. When they react that way I feel like I’ve done something for that. Three lemons – they won’t be crying over that.”

For the Portland Open Studios tour, Annie will explain her whole layout and also has an area where visitors can work on a canvas. She gives them a lot of things like credit cards, pallet knifes, squeegees, Q-tips, little things like that so they can work quickly and see how many different things they can use to make marks.

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