Meet our 2019 Jury

By Janie Lowe

This year, we decided to increase our jury from three to four judges.  They will be judging the artwork together and in person.  We feel that we will have a better idea about what the jurors are looking for and what impresses them in this way. As usual, the jury is comprised of working artists, an art educator and a gallerist.  Here they are:

Stephanie Chefas

Stephanie Chefas Projects is a labor of love from its owner, Stephanie Chefas, who has been independently curating art exhibits for nearly a decade in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and other locations.  Now calling Portland home, Chefas retains an eye for cutting-edge and often challenging work that demands attention. Highlighting a diverse blend of contemporary artists from around the world, the gallery features monthly exhibitions with an emphasis on cultivating new talent and encouraging risk and evolution among established visionaries. StephanieChefas website

Lisa Congdon


Fine artist, illustrator and author Lisa Congdon is best known for her colorful drawings and hand lettering. She works for clients around the world including Commes des Garçons, Ernie Ball, Crate and Barrel, Facebook, MoMA, REI, Sonos, Harvard University, Chronicle Books, and Random House Publishing, among many others. She is the author of seven books, including the starving-artist-myth-smashing Art Inc: The Essential Guide to Building Your Career as an Artist. She was named one of 40 Women Over 40 to Watch in 2015 and she is featured in the 2017 book, 200 Women Who Will Change the Way you See the World. She lives and works in Portland, Oregon. Lisa Congdon website

 Adriene Cruz

Harlem native Adriene Cruz received her BFA from the School of Visual Art in New York, and has been creating art in Portland for over 30 years.  Best known for her brilliantly colored and adorned art quilts, she has exhibited internationally and also designed, among other public works, the colorful Killingsworth Station on Interstate.  Adriene Cruz website

 Una Kim

Una Kim was born and raised in South Korea and immigrated to Los Angeles, California at the age of sixteen. She attended undergraduate school at the University of Southern California and graduate school at the Parsons School of Design, New York. She has shown her work nationally and internationally, with solo exhibitions in Gwangju and Daegu in South Korea, and Ningbo, China.  She  has completed two large murals in the Portland area,  and participated in international women’s exhibitions numerous times, the latest being at the National Museum, Beijing, China and Ho Chi Minh Museum, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Una Kim FB

Introducing Artist No. 50 – Dane Eisenbart

Dane Eisenbart is new to the tour this year, and we’re excited to have him on board. He was born and raised in the surrounding forests of the Tualatin Mountains, where he could often be found drawing or exploring outside. It’s here that he developed a fascination with the natural world which continues to inspire his artwork today. He enjoys exploring remote wilderness, hunting for small treasures, sea kayaking, and sharing stories of all kinds.

His work is characterized by anthropomorphic depictions of wildlife, dueling archetypes of light and dark, and an aesthetic of motion. He weaves together visual stories that resemble dream-like scenarios where nature’s laws are bent and new mythologies are born.

I had to ask how he got involved with art, because his art is so unusual. He explained “My mom is an incredible artist and I grew up idolizing her. There was always a variety of art supplies laying around the house and I took to art making really early. It was an intuitive way for me to spend my time and channel my energy. I think I proclaimed I would be a professional artist when I was four or five years old.”

“Every composition begins with the process of brainstorming, research, and stock image collection. I piece my findings together and begin sketching out the idea small before translating it to canvas. I work in multiple layers of oil paint. I rough in the first layer quickly without worrying too much about perfection. The second and third layers are often semi translucent glazes that shift the colors in the right direction and fine-tune the shadows and highlights of the piece. Each subsequent layer focuses more intently on details and my brush tends to get smaller the longer I work on a painting.

If you visit Dane in his studio this weekend or next, he will be showing several paintings in varying stages of progress and many more that are finished. He feels …”it’s is a great opportunity to learn about my process and see my creative space in person. As an added bonus you get to check out the Falcon Art Community which is home to an impressive collection of large format paintings. The space kind of has the feeling of a secret museum / art dungeon”

VISITORS 101 : GUIDE TO PORTLAND OPEN STUDIOS

So you want to experience Portland Open Studios over the next two weekends (Oct 14-15 and 21-22).  You’ve got a choice of 103 artists to visit over four days.  It doesn’t take a mathematician to see that planning for your tour might help.

Start by picking up our tour guide:  You can download a free phone app, or one with more bells and whistles for $5.99.  Or you can buy our commemorative full-color print guide for $15 at New Seasons, most art stores, and other select retail locations.   The guide is organized by communities (there are eight communities this year), and includes maps and addresses of participating artist studios in each community.  You can find artists by location, by medium, or by name!

We talked to two long-time tour goers, Sharee Schreiner and Diane Hunt, to get some advice on how to best do Portland Open Studios.  Some practical tips:

  • Plan ahead. Spend some time deciding which artists you want to visit.   Diane does this by getting familiar with the tour guide during the weeks before the tour (specifically, she keeps it on her passenger seat in the car, and skims the guide while stopped at traffic lights).  Sharee determines whom she might be interested in visiting by perusing the guide, then going online and researching those earmarked artists, and by visiting their personal websites. Once you decide whom you want to visit, mark them on the calendar, and plan your tour around the map itself, maximizing the experience.   You can also buy the phone app for $5.99, and mark favorites (it will automatically give you driving directions).
  • Don’t be shy, ask questions. The artists have been preparing for this tour for months, and they have a lot to share with you.  Just let them know what interests you.
  • Expect a really personal experience. Immerse yourself in the fun of it.  Especially if you buy something.  Says Diane:  If you go into each studio in the right frame of mind, you’re not just buying a piece of art, you are buying the story of your encounter with the artist.  When we visited her house, Diane had a story for each piece of art she bought during the Portland Open Studios tour.
  • If something grabs you, buy it. There’s a good chance that if you don’t, it won’t be there when you come back.  “I have missed things,” says Diane ruefully.  Remember that many of these artists will let you buy a piece in installments if you need it.  Don’t be afraid to ask about an installment plan
  • Follow us on Instagram (pdxopenstudios) and watch for chances to win prizes during the tour.
  • Be respectful to the artist and their space, because in so many cases the studio is their home. You’re going into someone’s private space, so it’s important to be respectful of that.