Introducing Artist No. 91 – Amanda Triplett

Amanda Triplett was always intuitively creative growing up. “I learned needle craft from my mother and I grew up doing a lot of theater and dance. I was notorious for making creative messes and spending my math class doodling in my notebook. When I got to college, I took my first real art class and fell deeply in love with painting and studio time. Sculpture followed after that.  Creating art is what feeds my soul. It’s also something that is innate within me. I’ve always done it. I’m happiest when I’m making work and I can’t help myself from doing it.”

I asked Amanda what inspired her work and she replied

“I think Nature is my greatest inspiration: biology, trees, the cosmos and the beautiful, unspeakable thing that binds it all together.”

Right now she’s working on larger scale, fiber installations. “I’m expanding into doing more installations of sculptural fiber. I really enjoy creating more immersive art experiences. I’m also working on some tiny pieces for my Specimen series. I like working on both macro and micro. Working tiny allows me to develop techniques and work with details. Working with large scale installation allows me to create a full, juicy experience for viewers.”

If you visit her on the tour, you can expect a range of different projects. “I will have my tiny Specimen series displayed. They are small, circular pieces, with lots of juicy details, embroidery, lace and beading. They are affordably priced and are excellent entry points into collecting my work. I also will have a larger installation downstairs in our spare room where you will be able to experience some of my larger scale work.”

Amanda shares her time right now between taking care of her family and making art.  “Right now I balance being a stay at home mom with making art. My hope is to expand my art business so that when both my kids are in elementary school I can continue to do art full time.”

Introducing Artist No. 12, Winifred Martinson

Winifred Martinson is also new to the tour this year.  She describes herself as “California born and bred”.  Unbelievably she only began learning the techniques of making art as an adult.  “I paint realistically what I think is beautiful in nature, in an atmospheric and ethereal style.  In the 1980s I learned from workshops with Zoltan Szabo in Los Angeles, from Life Drawing courses at Pasadena City College, but mostly I am self-taught.  “Mr. Szabo’s work still inspires me.  His subtle color choices and impressionistic style have a strong influence on my work.  When I teach, my students for the most part learn from those techniques. His advice to limit the number of colors used is basic to my style.

“I usually paint indoors, from a sketch or photo of a subject that somehow resonates with me.  I often paint animals or birds, beginning with the eyes.  If I can’t love the effect of the eyes, the painting will be abandoned.”

A pivotal point in her artistic career occurred in 2001 when she moved to McMinnville. “I was encouraged by the Hidden Treasures Gallery, The Currents Gallery and The Pacific Frame and Gallery to go public with my large privately held body of work.”

If you visit her on the tour you’ll be able to watch her working on a current project.  She also plans to have a children’s station